Attorney for Unmarried Parents | Portland, OR

Unmarried Parents
Establishing Paternity, Parenting Plans, Child Custody, Child Visitation & Child Support | The Martin Law Firm, P.C.

The Martin Law Firm, P.C., attorneys at law, represent unmarried parents, whether a parent needs to establish paternity, create a parenting plan addressing child custody and child visitation, or receive child support.

Establishing Paternity

If a voluntary acknowledgment of paternity has not been signed by the father, paternity must be established. This is typically done through DNA testing. Regardless of whether your case is in Oregon or Washington, you can request that the state assist you with determining the paternity of a child. You may also petition the court for assistance in establishing paternity. Paternity can also be established if the father signs a voluntary acknowledgment of paternity declaring himself as the father of the child and files the acknowledgment with the State Registar of Vital Statistics if the child was born in Oregon. If the child was born in Washington, the acknowledgment is filed with the Washington State Registrar of Vital Statistics.

Creating A Parenting Plan

Once paternity is established, it is necessary to come up with an appropriate parenting plan that serves in the child's best interests. Ultimately, it is best for the parents to work together to come up with a parenting plan. However, if the parents cannot agree to a parenting plan, most Oregon counties require the parents to participate in mediation before a court will make a final decision in the matter. Oregon also requires the parents to complete a parenting class that is offered in the county where the case has been filed. There is no such requirement in Washington.

Evaluating Child Custody & Child Visitation Time

One or both parents may also choose to have a formal child custody/parenting time evaluation conducted to determine which parent should be the primary custodial parent and what the parenting time/residential schedule should be for the parents and the child. The custody evaluator is typically a licensed social worker, but may have other credentials such as a degree in psychology. The child custody evaluator will interview both parents extensively, meet with the child, observe the child while interacting separately with each of the parents, and interview collateral references. If the facts of the case justify it, psychological testing will be ordered for one or both parents as well as drug and alcohol testing. At the conclusion of this process the child custody evaluator will issue a written report to the attorneys representing the parents which contains recommendation regarding custody and visitation. A parent may challenge the recommendation in court.

Calculating & Paying Child Support

Regardless of whether your paternity case is filed in Oregon or Washington, one of the parents will be ordered to pay the other parent child support. Both Oregon and Washington have child support guidelines and worksheets/calculations which specify the amount of support that should be paid based on a number of factors including, but not limited to, the incomes of the parents, the visitation schedule, daycare and medical insurance costs.

Paternity Attorney | Portland, Oregon

Family Law Attorney Lisa Martin represents clients in Clark County, Washington as well as Multnomah, Washington, Clackamas, Columbia and Yamhill County, Oregon, including the cities of Vancouver, Camas, Battle Ground, Ridgefield, Washougal, Portland, Tualatin, Wilsonville, Sherwood, Gresham, Hillsboro, Lake Oswego, West Linn, Beaverton, Tigard, St. Helens and Scapoose. To set up an appointment to speak with Ms. Martin, please call 503-220-1620.

Contact Us

The Martin Law Firm, P.C.
One SW Columbia Street
Suite 1685
Portland, OR 97258

[T] 503-220-1620
[F] 503-220-1622
[E] E-mail

Schedule An Appointment

To set up an appointment to meet with family law attorney Lisa E. Martin, please call 503-220-1620.


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